[Lilia Zaouali] Æ Medieval Cuisine of the Islamic World: A Concise History with 174 Recipes (California Studies in Food and Culture) [love-inspired-suspense PDF] Ebook Epub Download í I found this book inspirational, as a cookbook and as a work of history First, for the cookbook Cooking all over the world has, historically, been a trade learned through apprenticeship and practice, rarely through books As such, cookbooks as well as individual recipes appear only scarcely in most cultures until well after the beginning of the 19th century not true of Islamic cultures The Islamic world from Baghdad to C rdoba began creating cookbooks as early as the 10th century A.
D Recipes comprise the entire second half of Medieval Cuisine of the Islamic World First comes a selection that Lilia Zaouali drew directly from medieval sources Next comes a number of modern Middle Eastern recipes which echo the medieval ones in ingredients and preparation A number of characteristics about medieval Islamic cookery spring immediately to the fore It was a meat heavy cuisine, even referring to vegetarian dishes as counterfeit , though a number of the recipes seem quite adaptable to a vegetarian diet with minimal alterations or substitutions Also, the palette of flavors used to create most dishes provides intriguing contrast to the herb laden western arsenal oregano, thyme, rosemary, etc Most of the dishes in this book rely on spice cumin, coriander, cinnamon, peppers rather than herb and on a sweet sour base rather than a savory one Almost every dish calls for vinegar and most for honey or some other sweetener I could not wait to finish this book simply so I could rush to my kitchen and begin experimenting And delicious recipes comprise only one aspect of this lovely volume.
Next, on to the history In the first half of Zaouali s book, she offers an overview of Islamic culinary traditions and a brief discussion of the specific books she used in compiling her volume Medieval Islamic nobility placed great value on fine cuisine It put me in mind of Elizabethan England where so many noblemen wrote verse In Baghdad, nobles may have turned out some poetry as well, but they also cooked And they cooked feasts so lavish with dishes so intricate and heavily spiced that they began recording some of these wonders Additionally, writers interested in medicine often included recipes for dishes deemed especially healthful Even with this relative wealth of historical documentation and sources, re enlivening something as intangible as thousand year old flavor proves formidable These centuries old recipes rely on assumed common knowledge that, in the 21st century, is no longer common For example, one often reads the phrase, the usual amount for a measurement or is advised to cook something for the normal amount of time U sual and normal in the context of a medieval recipe have lost their meaning for a modern reader or cook As with so much in history, even with this treasure trove of sources, our final recourse to reconstructing medieval cookery from Andalusia, across the Maghreb and into Persia, remains firmly with the imagination.
Vinegar And Sugar, Dried Fruit, Rose Water, Spices From India And China, Sweet Wine Made From Raisins And Dates These Are The Flavors Of The Golden Age Of Arab Cuisine This Book, A Delightful Culinary Adventure That Is Part History And Part Cookbook, Surveys The Gastronomical Art That Developed At The Caliph S Sumptuous Palaces In Ninth And Tenth Century Baghdad, Drew Inspiration From Persian, Greco Roman, And Turkish Cooking, And Rapidly Spread Across The Mediterranean In A Charming Narrative, Lilia Zaouali Brings To Life Islam S Vibrant Culinary HeritageThe Second Half Of The Book Gathers An Extensive Selection Of original Recipes Drawn From Medieval Culinary Sources Along With Thirty One Contemporary Recipes That Evoke The Flavors Of The Middle Ages Featuring Dishes Such As Chicken With Walnuts And Pomegranate, Beef With Pistachios, Bazergan Couscous, Lamb Stew With Fresh Apricots, Tuna And Eggplant Pur E With Vinegar And Caraway, And Stuffed Dates, The Book Also Discusses Topics Such As Cookware, Utensils, Aromatic Substances, And Condiments, Making It Both An Entertaining read And An Informative Resource For Anyone Who Enjoys The Fine Art Of Cooking Lovers of food history will appreciate this fine volume from Lilia Zaouali, which summarizes and introduces readers to medieval Islamic elite cookery A collection of recipes at the end permit readers to personally savor and serve history on the table This would be a fun book for a small group to study and share over a meal prepared from the recipes included.
I really enjoyed reading this book, especially at the end of the year when festive dishes are prepared and enjoyed My favourite part of the book is definitely the historical part at the beginning where the author talks the history of food in Islam and its relation to food I also enjoyed learning about how cookbooks came about and learning about how tastes and dishes changed or adjusted through the various regions of the Islamic World In addition I liked that the author included recipes, although many dishes were unfamiliar to me, and the use of American measurements in the contemporary recipes just gave me a headache But other that those details, that might not even bother anyone but me, this book was a true delight like a prefect desert at the end of the year I found this book inspirational, as a cookbook and as a work of history First, for the cookbook Cooking all over the world has, historically, been a trade learned through apprenticeship and practice, rarely through books As such, cookbooks as well as individual recipes appear only scarcely in most cultures until well after the beginning of the 19th century not true of Islamic cultures The Islamic world from Baghdad to C rdoba began creating cookbooks as early as the 10th century A.
D Recipes comprise the entire second half of Medieval Cuisine of the Islamic World First comes a selection that Lilia Zaouali drew directly from medieval sources Next comes a number of modern Middle Eastern recipes which echo the medieval ones in ingredients and preparation A number of characteristics about medieval Islamic cookery spring immediately to the fore It was a meat heavy cuisine, even referring to vegetarian dishes as counterfeit , though a number of the recipes seem quite adaptable to a vegetarian diet with minimal alterations or substitutions Also, the palette of flavors used to create most dishes provides intriguing contrast to the herb laden western arsenal oregano, thyme, rosemary, etc Most of the dishes in this book rely on spice cumin, coriander, cinnamon, peppers rather than herb and on a sweet sour base rather than a savory one Almost every dish calls for vinegar and most for honey or some other sweetener I could not wait to finish this book simply so I could rush to my kitchen and begin experimenting And delicious recipes comprise only one aspect of this lovely volume.
Next, on to the history In the first half of Zaouali s book, she offers an overview of Islamic culinary traditions and a brief discussion of the specific books she used in compiling her volume Medieval Islamic nobility placed great value on fine cuisine It put me in mind of Elizabethan England where so many noblemen wrote verse In Baghdad, nobles may have turned out some poetry as well, but they also cooked And they cooked feasts so lavish with dishes so intricate and heavily spiced that they began recording some of these wonders Additionally, writers interested in medicine often included recipes for dishes deemed especially healthful Even with this relative wealth of historical documentation and sources, re enlivening something as intangible as thousand year old flavor proves formidable These centuries old recipes rely on assumed common knowledge that, in the 21st century, is no longer common For example, one often reads the phrase, the usual amount for a measurement or is advised to cook something for the normal amount of time U sual and normal in the context of a medieval recipe have lost their meaning for a modern reader or cook As with so much in history, even with this treasure trove of sources, our final recourse to reconstructing medieval cookery from Andalusia, across the Maghreb and into Persia, remains firmly with the imagination.
Excellent food history of cuisine as portrayed in medieval Arabic manuscripts Includes many recipes for cooks who wish to experiment Fascinating insights into how recipes have changed, or how the names have come to be applied to totally different dishes Also very good on the differences between the cuisine of the eastern part of the medieval Islamic world and the western part centred in Andalusia and North Africa Also of the Persian and Greco Roman links and some fascinating insights into the transmission of foodways into Europe Includes a number of contemporary Maghrebi recipes illustrating the transmission of medieval cuisine from Andalusia into North Africa from the post 1492 expulsion of the Jews and Muslims from Spain.
Excellent food history of cuisine as portrayed in medieval Arabic manuscripts Includes many recipes for cooks who wish to experiment Fascinating insights into how recipes have changed, or how the names have come to be applied to totally different dishes Also very good on the differences between the cuisine of the eastern part of the medieval Islamic world and the western part centred in Andalusia and North Africa Also of the Persian and Greco Roman links and some fascinating insights into the transmission of foodways into Europe Includes a number of contemporary Maghrebi recipes illustrating the transmission of medieval cuisine from Andalusia into North Africa from the post 1492 expulsion of the Jews and Muslims from Spain.
The subject matter is presented as dry as possible to make sure no one s having too much fun with history but despite the academic desiccation, underneath that is a suggestion of a fascinating time period and culture.
The book of my dreams So much history packed into one small volume It s dense but fascinating.
This actually, is an excellent book, with lotsof very interesting information not always directly connected to the subject of food My reservations are purely academic This is published in a series on food history by the University of California Press There isn t a bibliography as such Being sort of a cook book, one might allow for the lack of one, and the author does list and discuss the four main food manuscripts the recipies come from or may have been based on However, the first half of the book is academic history containing some very worthwhile and pertinent discussion regading food and culture in the middle east Any bibliography for the book at all is contained within endnotes I have a personal peeve against bibliography in endnotes, as it seems a lazy way of documentation, often leaving the reader the responsibility of filtering through however many Ibids may exist to find the desired citation I think it also allows for missed citations as well, which I did experience in this text, trying to find the original listin of a poem the author translated Upon checking the connected endnote, I m told that the poem presented is the author s translation, but not from what it was translated.
Overall, this is an excellent book for those interested in early and modern middle eastern cooking Researchers just need to be prepared to dig so than normal to follow up on interesting tidbits.
I was excited to see this unusual book filled with exotic recipes that sound delicious Unfortunately, the text is very difficult to follow, especially if you are using it for directions The author clearly is excited about the material and encourages the reader to experiment For folk who have not experimented with unusual spices and ingredients, this is not a good selection The bulk of the text is recipes from the medieval world and they do not use measurements or times These are a bit crucial Towards the end, Zaouali includes some modern adaptations, but again, there are difficulties in securing some of the odd ingredients I found some substitutes for key ingredients, but others are a total mystery to me I still do not know where I could find ras el hanut There are not many Arabic or Lebanese markets in the Deep South.
Islam at the Table From the Middle Ages to the Present a study of medieval cuisine of the Islamic Mediterranean drawn from the many cookbooks and surviving traditions, showing the long trade lengths rice and ginger from China , Berber influences couscous and Tagine methods , ingredients local to the Middle East sumac za atar, eggplants, sugarcane, lemons, rose water , halal rules and the available baking ovens and cooking surfaces With sidelights on etiquette and cleanliness rules, as well as the special demands of pickling or sugaring things for storage in a hot climate or for travel pomegranate raisin paste spiced with cumin and dried as medieval energy bars.
Zaouali s book is full of very interesting historical information on Muslim culture and food in the Islamic world during the Middle Ages Based on four cookbooks written between the 10th and 13th Centuries, she discusses the ingredients available, various cooking processes, cookware, diet, and how dishes have changed over time A large portion of the book is dedicated to recipes, which come from the cookbooks Zaouali examines.
Lovers of food history will appreciate this fine volume from Lilia Zaouali, which summarizes and introduces readers to medieval Islamic elite cookery A collection of recipes at the end permit readers to personally savor and serve history on the table This would be a fun book for a small group to study and share over a meal prepared from the recipes included.